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Tag Archives: Roy’s World

Roy’s World: Barry Gifford & Chicago / The More the Merrier in Northbrook

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I couldn’t be more excited to announce that I am producing Roy’s World, a feature-length documentary by my friend Rob Christopher about the great Chicago-born-and-bred writer Barry Gifford (Wild at Heart). It will feature the voice talent of Willem Dafoe, Matt Dillon and Lili Taylor as well as an original jazz score by Jason Adasiewicz. You can learn more about the film at the IFP Chicago site here. You can hear Rob and I discuss the film with Gary Zidek on his radio show The Arts Desk here. Finally, Chicagoans can catch Barry reading stories from his latest collection The Cuban Club at Constellation this Saturday, November 4 at 8:30pm. The event will also feature live music from Adasiewicz who will be playing selections from the Roy’s World soundtrack. You can learn more about the show at Constellation’s site here.

Also, I have a capsule review of George Stevens’ screwball masterpiece The More the Merrier in this week’s Cine-File. It screens at the Northbrook Public Library on 35mm next Wednesday, November 8 at 1pm and 7:30pm. You can read the full review below.

Joel McCrea and Jean Arthur in a scene from THE MORE THE MERRIER, 1943.

George Stevens’ THE MORE THE MERRIER (American Revival)
This superior example of the “genius of the Hollywood studio system” may not be as well known as screwball comedy classics like THE AWFUL TRUTH, BRINGING UP BABY or THE LADY EVE but is every bit their equal as a battle-of-the-sexes masterpiece. Connie Milligan (the glorious Jean Arthur) is a single, working woman living in Washington D.C. who ends up with two male roommates due to a World War II housing shortage. She finds herself bickering relentlessly with Joe Carter (Joel McCrea), the younger of the men, which, as any screwball fan knows, is a sure sign of romantic chemistry. The other man, the much older Mr. Dingle (Charles Coburn, who deservedly won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance), consequently finds himself playing cupid to his new roommates in what amounts to an enormously entertaining, extremely witty and perfectly paced 104 minutes. The thing that really makes THE MORE THE MERRIER stand out when viewed today though is its unabashed eroticism. A scene where Carter walks Milligan home late at night, temporarily forgetting that he’s also going to his own home, is almost unbelievably sensual in the way the characters flirt with each other and, moreimportantly, interact physically; while sitting next to one another on a stoop, McCrea, one of Hollywood’s most reserved and laconic actors, creatively paws at Arthur (who, at 42 years old, never looked sexier), seductively encircling her waist and neck with his hands as she half-heartedly feigns disinterest. THE MORE THE MERRIER was very well received in its time but is probably less known today only because George Stevens, the solid craftsman who directed it, is not an auteurist-approved figure. This is unfortunate because if a more erotic film was made in Hollywood in the 1940s I have yet to see it. (1943, 35mm) MGS

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WCCRH Episode 14: PAUSE OF THE CLOCK

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Episode 14 of the White City Cinema Radio Hour sees me interviewing Chicago-based filmmaker (and Cine-File critic, and my pal!) Rob Christopher about his debut feature film, PAUSE OF THE CLOCK, ahead of its local premiere at the Gene Siskel Film Center on October 3. Christopher describes in detail how his intentions and methods evolved over the course of making this unique production, which was shot in 1995/1996 but not edited until 2015. The episode concludes with the two of us discussing our recent experience co-authoring questions for David Lynch for a Time Out article, as well as having a short rap about Christopher’s next film, a documentary about writer Barry Gifford. Listen here: http://www.transistorchicago.com/wccrh

Related: Pause of the Clock‘s website and Facebook page.


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