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Category Archives: Film Festivals

RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO Wins Best Comedy at the Lindsey Film Fest

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I am so honored that RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO won the Best Film Comedy award at the George Lindsey UNA Film Festival in Florence, Alabama last night! This was a great festival and it was a privilege just to screen alongside so many accomplished short and feature-length films. The award (our second Best Comedy award after Strasburg last fall) belongs to our entire cast and crew.

The next RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO screening will take place at the Beverly Arts Center on Wednesday, March 13 at 7:30pm and be followed by a Q&A with me conducted by critic Daniel Nava. Our next festival screening will take place at the Women’s Film Festival in Philadelphia on the evening of Sunday, March 17 and be followed by a Q&A with me and producer Layne Marie Williams. For more info, visit the “Screenings” page.

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MAGNOLIA & CLEMENTINE at the Beloit International Film Festival

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There is a long tradition of American actresses becoming directors (including figures as disparate as Ida Lupino, Elaine May and Barbara Loden), often in order to give themselves better roles than what they’ve typically been offered by their male filmmaking counterparts. This trend has gratifyingly ramped up with a renewed urgency in the “Me Too” era: Among the very best short films to play Chicago cinema screens over the past year are urgent, female-centric works like Clare Cooney’s Runner and Maggie Scrantom’s Atoms of Ashes, both locally made. Magnolia & Clementine, a 16-minute short by Tennessee-based actress-turned-filmmaker Ashley Shelton, offers welcome proof that this is a nationwide trend. It’s a potent dramedy about an aspiring writer (Shelton) who throws a short story in the trash but is later mortified to learn that her live-in boyfriend (Linds Edwards) has stolen the concept when his own “original” story is published to acclaim. Anyone planning on attending the Beloit International Film Festival this weekend — where Shelton’s movie will screen on Friday, February 22 and Sunday, February 24 — would do well to check it out.

Magnolia & Clementine is, as one would expect, a great showcase for Shelton’s talents as an actress. A veteran of film and television in front of the camera, she does a lot here in a short span of time (plays a dual role, cries real tears, plays drunk, etc.) but the film ultimately delights because of her very real skills as a writer and director. Shelton understands the importance of pacing in film comedy: Many of the biggest laughs result from her cinematography and editing choices — whether it’s an eyeline match between the protagonist and an image of Jesus, or ending a scene with the “punchline” of a close-up of an empty roll of toilet paper. More importantly, Magnolia & Clementine starts off as a comedy but unexpectedly morphs into a poignant tale of self-discovery, a Chaplin-esque tonal balancing act that Shelton pulls off with admirable precision. What begins as a story about a relationship between a woman and a man ends up being about a woman’s relationship with herself as she learns to overcome her insecurities and fully declare herself an artist. There could be no more fitting subject for a filmmaking debut as auspicious as this one.

To learn more about this weekend’s screenings of Magnolia & Clementine, including ticket info and showtimes, visit the Beloit International Film Festival’s website.

 


First 2019 RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO Screenings Announced

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There is a great story by Joey Filer at the essential Chicago film-industry news website Reel Chicago all about RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO. It features quotes from producer Layne Marie Williams, actress Clare Cooney and yours truly, and breaks the exciting news that our Chicago Premiere will be held at the Gene Siskel Film Center in February! Filer also makes some rather salient critical points about the film. He writes, “RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO’s music, camera work, 4:3 aspect ratio, narrative arc, vignette structure, and pacing, along with one of the most unconventional dance scenes in recent memory, all beg to be analyzed in a film theory course and written about in scholarly journals.” You can read the full article here.

I am also very excited to announce that our first festival screenings in 2019 will take place at the Santa Fe Film Festival in New Mexico (exact date TBA but the fest is held 2/13-2/17) and the Beloit International Film Festival in Wisconsin (exact date tba but the fest is held 2/23-3/04). Members of the cast and/or crew will be present for live Q&As after both screenings. Even more screenings will be announced soon – so stay tuned!

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RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO in Cinefile Chicago

Rendezvous in Chicago screens at the Oakton Pop-Up Film Festival in Des Plaines (the Illinois Premiere!) this Thursday, November 29 at 2pm. Critic Scott Pfeiffer has reviewed the film for Cine-File Chicago. I found his spoiler-free review so insightful that I’m reprinting it below in its entirety. Check it out then come to the screening on Thursday:

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Oakton Pop-Up Film Festival

Oakton Community College (1600 E. Golf Rd., Des Plaines) — Tuesday-Friday, November 27-30 (Free Admission)

Michael Glover Smith’s RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO (New American)
Thursday, 2pm
At a time when our leaders prey on, and feed off, the worst parts of ourselves, it couldn’t be a more necessary time for an homage to Éric Rohmer. That’s just what my friend, Cine-File‘s own Mike Smith, has given us with his third feature, the sweet, delightful, humanistic rom-com RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO. It celebrates love and intelligence—that is to say, the best in us. Smith has taken the basic form of Rohmer’s RENDEZVOUS IN PARIS—three sketches united by their setting in one of the world’s great cities—and added his own original agenda, which encompasses feminism and a pro-gay vision. He’s even shot the movie in Rohmer’s favored boxy Academy aspect ratio. Smith’s script, based on stories he dreamed up with Jill McKeown (his wife and also a friend), shows his knack for the simple yet elegant structure: the three chapters correspond to the beginning, middle, and end of love, respectively, with the end cycling back into the beginning. Coming out of acting retirement after 37 years, Haydée Politoff, from Rohmer’s touchstone LA COLLECTIONNEUSE (1967), performs a place-setting Hyde Park prologue. She’s the faculty adviser to U of C doctoral candidate Delaney, wittily played by Clare Cooney. The first vignette, The Brothers Karamazov, takes place in a little candlelit wine bar. If I say it’s a bit of a Kubrickian/Lynchian antechamber, that belies how cozy it actually is. It’s a lonely Sunday night and whip-smart Delaney is working on her thesis. Suddenly, she finds herself being hit on, not entirely unwelcomed, by the only other patron: none other than Paul, the likably pretentious aspiring writer from COOL APOCALYPSE, Smith’s debut. (Amusingly, when we get a glimpse of what Paul’s writing, it’s the end of MERCURY IN RETROGRADE, Smith’s second feature.) Once again, Paul is played by the funny Kevin Wehby, who’s emerging as Smith’s Jean-Pierre Léaud, or Kyle MacLachlan. Delaney proposes a naughty little game, which quickly hoists Paul with his own male petard. The second sketch, Cats and Dogs, is my favorite. Achieving an effortless Linklater-ian tone, it follows a gay couple, Andy and Rob, as they walk from their Rogers Park home to the shores of Lake Michigan. Smith sets the scene with glimpses of the Essanay and Selig Polyscope buildings, nods to Chicago’s rich film history, a subject on which he literally wrote the book. We know, but Andy doesn’t, that Rob has a question to pop, but look out—as they meet the neighborhood’s dogs, it emerges that Andy’s more of a cat person, whereas Rob’s a dog guy! As Andy and Rob, respectively, Rashaad Hall and Matthew Sherbach are so natural, charming, and funny that I not only wanted them to be a real couple, I wanted to be their friend. They run into Tess from COOL APOCALYPSE (Chelsea David), who’s out walking Sophie the Shih Tzu, playing herself in a flawless method performance. When the gents get to the beach, there’s a moving homage to the immortal “Lake Shore Drive” by the late Skip Haynes, to whom the film is dedicated. The third sketch, The End Is the Beginning, is the most minimalist. It features Nina Ganet, back as Julie from COOL APOCALYPSE. After a sudden, tumultuous rom-com breakup with Wyatt from MERCURY IN RETROGRADE (Shane Simmons), Julie finds herself alone again, but for us. Warming to us, she begins to fall in love with the camera itself: that is to say, with you and me. Since she’s played by the sunny, freckle-faced Ganet, how can we resist falling in love back, at least a little? It’s a remarkably benign, even celebratory, view of “the gaze.”  As Julie takes us in her arms to dance, we spin round and round, dizzy on the cusp of new love. As an Ohio boy who’s lived in Chicago for 25 years now, I love the idea of doing for my adopted city what Rohmer did for Paris. My personal feeling is that the magic is always there in Chicago: you just need to know how to look. Perhaps the most valuable thing RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO did for me is to renew that feeling, after all these years. It’s a vision to treasure: heaven might just be a beach on the shores of Lake Michigan, lolling away the afternoon with someone you love, in Chicago, Illinois. Smith, producer Layne Marie Williams, and select cast in person (moderated by Cine-File Associate Editor Kathleen Sachs). (2018, 69 min, Digital Projection) SP


Two New RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO Radio Interviews!

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Clare Cooney and I recently appeared on two Chicago-area radio shows to promote the upcoming RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO screening at the Oakton Pop-Up Film Festival. There is very little overlap between these and the No Coast Cinema interview we did last month so all are worth listening to!

On Tuesday, November 13, we appeared on the Nick Digilio Show on WGN radio. You can listen to that 30-minute segment here.

Yesterday, Sunday, November 18, we appeared on WCGO’s Playtime with Bill Turck and Kerri Kendall. You can watch the 10-minute interview on Facebook Live by skipping to the one-hour-and-fifty-minute mark here.

More interviews and reviews should drop soon – so stay tuned!


RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO at the Strasburg Film Festival

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RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO had its second festival screening at the Strasburg Film Festival in Strasburg, Virginia on Sunday, November 11. The screening was held at the Box Office Brewery, a beautiful old movie theater that has been converted into a craft brewery. Representing the film were yours truly and stories co-author Jillian McKeown. Much to our delight we won the award for Best Comedy and were presented with a beautiful earthenware trophy during the Q&A following the screening. This was a big honor considering the festival received over 5,500 submissions from 100+ countries and we were very impressed by the quality of the other films being screened. Check out the full list of winners on the festival’s website here. Big thanks to the Strasburg Film Festival staff and everyone who came out to the screening, and congrats to the entire RENDEZVOUS cast and crew!
Our next screening will be the Oakton Pop-Up Film Festival in Des Plaines, IL on 11/29. Stay tuned for more info including 2019 screening dates!


Olivier Assayas’ NON-FICTION at CIFF

I reviewed Olivier Assayas’ Non-Fiction for Cine-File Chicago. It screens for the second and final time at the Chicago International Film Festival today. I’m reproducing my capsule review in its entirety below.

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Olivier Assayas’ NON-FICTION (France)
Saturday 10/13, 3:30pm
Olivier Assayas’ witty, deceptively simple NON-FICTION begins with a comically tense scene in which Alain, (Guillaume Canet), a suave book publisher, and Leonard (Vincent Macaigne), a Luddite author whose controversial novels are thinly disguised autobiography, argue about the virtues of Twitter. The seemingly meandering narrative that follows belies a clever structure that resolves itself 90-odd minutes later with Shakespearean symmetry when both men vacation together with their wives: Alain’s partner, Selena (Juliette Binoche), is a television actress ambivalent about her recent success on a cop show, and Valerie (Nora Hamzawi), Leonard’s wife, is a high-profile attorney and the breadwinner in their relationship. This quartet represents a spectrum of diverse attitudes towards globalization and humanity’s slavish dependence on technology in an increasingly digital world yet it is to Assayas’ credit as a writer that they also always come across as fully fleshed-out characters, never mere mouthpieces for differing points-of-view. It’s the talkiest film Assayas has yet made though the dense dialogue scenes are cleverly edited in a brisk, Fincher-esque manner, and he often generates humor through the surprising way he ends scenes abruptly. It’s a substantial new chapter in an important body of work, one that illustrates the director’s philosophy that the role of the artist is to invent new tools to comment on a modern world that’s always changing. (2018, 106 min) MGS


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