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The Last Ten Movies I Saw

1. M (Lang)
2. Rendezvous in Chicago (Smith)
3. City That Never Sleeps (Auer)
4. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Lang)
5. The 400 Blows (Truffaut)
6. Man with the Movie Camera (Vertov)
7. Sherlock Jr. (Keaton)
8. Berlin Express (Tourneur)
9. Our Hospitality (Keaton)
10. The Image Book (Godard)

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RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO Review Roundup!

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Happy Chicago Premiere Day! I am very fortunate that RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO has received some stellar reviews from some great film critics in the days leading up to tonight’s local premiere at the Gene Siskel Film Center!

In today’s Chicago Sun-Times, Richard Roeper calls RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO “a quiet and yet exhilaratingly entertaining comedic drama consisting of three stand-alone vignettes.” You can read his full 3-and-a-half (out of 4) star review here.

In a “Recommended” review at Newcity Chicago, Ray Pride writes “RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO falls somewhere between the squirrelly hush and face-level modesty of Éric Rohmer and the spiky, quietly antic trickery of Arnaud Desplechin.” Read his full capsule here.

At HollywoodChicago.com, Pat McDonald writes “Michael Glover Smith has paired the pitch of woo in a sophisticated Midwestern burg. RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO is the romance-in-the-Windy-City movie the world has been waiting for.” You can read his full 5 (out of 5) star review here.

At ChicagoFilm.com Lee Shoquist concludes his review by writing “In RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO, Smith and his talented stable of local actors remind us that storytelling, more than anything, is about a well-written screenplay, engaging stars (with whom he generously gives ample close-ups and minimizes cuts as to allow sustained moments to build character) and recognizable human interaction.” Read the full review here.

Tonight’s screening at the Siskel Center is sold out but you can purchase tickets for our remaining three shows (on 2/9, 2/11 & 2/13) online at the Siskel’s website here.

Red carpet pics coming soon. Stay tuned!


RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO on the Depth of Field Podcast

 

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I was recently interviewed by Andy Miles about Rendezvous in Chicago for his “Depth of Field” podcast ahead of our local premiere at the Gene Siskel Film Center this Friday, February 8. This wide-ranging conversation also covers my previous work (Mercury in Retrograde and Cool Apocalypse), and contains audio clips from all three movies as well as from Jason Coffman’s superb Rendezvous score. Listen here.


Jean-Luc Godard’s THE IMAGE BOOK

My review of Jean-Luc Godard’s The Image Book was published at Cine-File today. The film, which opens at the Siskel Center today for a three-week run, is almost certainly the best new film I will see all year. Here’s the review in its entirety:

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Jean-Luc Godard’s THE IMAGE BOOK (New French)
Gene Siskel Film Center – Check Venue website for show times

When I screened A MAN ESCAPED in an Intro to Film class a few years ago, one particularly bright student seemed riveted by Bresson’s radical and extensive use of first-person voice-over narration, close-ups of hands at work, and the unusual way these elements interacted with each other. In a post-screening discussion, he made the salient point that “It was as if Lieutenant Fontaine’s hands were doing the thinking and the talking.” I was reminded of this remark at the beginning of Jean-Luc Godard’s THE IMAGE BOOK when a close-up depicts a man’s hands splicing together two shots of 35mm film at an editing table. On the soundtrack, Godard’s 87-year-old voice, now a sepulchral whisper, informs us that “man’s true condition” is to “think with hands.” This is shortly followed by what appears to be a documentary image of a concentration-camp victim’s emaciated fingers. Hand imagery from a variety of sources – from a shot of Bunuel wielding a straight razor in the opening of UN CHIEN ANDALOU to the detail of an index finger pointing upwards in Da Vinci’s painting John the Baptist – proliferates in the early stages of THE IMAGE BOOK. This serves to introduce the film’s structure (“five chapters like the five fingers of a hand”) and overall aesthetic strategy (mixing excerpts of narrative films with documentaries, high art, cell-phone videos, etc.); but, more importantly, it reminds us of Godard’s belief that a filmmaker is ideally someone who works with his or her hands, operating “small instruments” like the analog equipment on which Godard begins the process of slicing and dicing the contents of his vast image data bank before he passes that footage on to his cinematographer/co-editor Fabrice Aragno for a digital upgrade. After this brief prologue, THE IMAGE BOOK proper begins: The first four “chapters” feature Godard’s associative montage at its most rigorous – he traces various images, ideas and motifs throughout film history (water, trains, war, the concept of “the law,” etc.) in a manner not unlike that of his mammoth video essay HISTOIRE(S) DU CINEMA. But, even when it feels most familiar, these passages in THE IMAGE BOOK still show Godard to be a restless experimenter: The famous scene in Nicholas Ray’s JOHNNY GUITAR where Sterling Hayden implores Joan Crawford to “lie” by professing her love for him (a scene Godard has already quoted in several other films) gets a new look by the introduction of a black screen during what should be a shot of Hayden, so that viewers only see the corresponding reverse-angle shot of Crawford in their charged dialogue exchange. Another new trick up the director’s sleeve is the way he presents shots in a deliberately incorrect aspect ratio (i.e., the images appear horizontally stretched) before having them “pop” into the proper ratio, an amusing and oddly satisfying poetic effect. The film’s darker and more disturbing elements, on the other hand, have caused some critics to categorize it as a “horror movie.” In one instance, Godard provocatively juxtaposes an execution scene from Rossellini’s PAISAN, in which Italian partisans are drowned by their Nazi captors, with eerily similar, recent non-fiction footage of ISIS executions. Elsewhere, he juxtaposes images of exploited performers – intercutting shots of a grinning “pinhead” from Tod Browning’s FREAKS with someone performing anilingus in a pornographic film of unknown origin (the latter is identified only as “PORNO” in the lengthy bibliography that makes up most of the closing credits). But it’s the fifth and final chapter, taking up almost the entire second half of the film, that sees Godard boldly striking out into truly new territory: This section examines how Western artists frequently misrepresent the Arab world by depicting it in simplistic and reductive terms (i.e., as either “joyful” or “barbaric”). Godard quotes extensively from authors I haven’t read (e.g., Edward Saïd and Albert Cossery) but the overall meaning is clear in an extended scene that focuses on a fictional Arabic country named Dofa whose “underground has no oil” but whose Prime Minister nonetheless dreams of submitting all Gulf countries to his rule. What’s incredible about this sequence is the startling way Godard conveys the “story” solely through his narration while the image track is comprised of a cornucopia of found footage from movies by both Western and Arabic filmmakers (not to mention some hyper-saturated shots apparently captured by Godard and Aragno on location in Tunisia that are the most visually ravishing in the film). That it’s often difficult to determine where these shots came from is, of course, part of the point. In an otherwise war-and-death-obsessed work that feels even more despairing than usual for this gnomic artist, Godard does, however, express hope for the possibility of a new poetics of cinema, one in which Middle-Eastern and African filmmakers might discover new ways of seeing and hearing themselves. The wild sound design, always a highlight in late Godard, reaches new levels of expressiveness here as voices, sounds and snippets of music aggressively ping-pong back and forth between multiple stereo channels – essentially doing for the ears what the groundbreaking 3D of GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE did for the eyes. In a lengthy post-credits sequence, Godard’s voice-over eventually devolves into a coughing fit while a rhapsodic dance sequence from Max Ophuls’ LE PLAISIR gets the final word on the image track. In spite of what some of his detractors think, Godard still believes in the elemental power of cinema, which is why the mesmerizing IMAGE BOOK is a more accessible work than even many of its champions would have you believe. Spotting references and decoding meanings is ultimately less important than the sensorial experience of simply vibing with the uniquely romantic/pessimistic tone engendered by this giant of the medium’s total mastery of “image et parole.”

Note: The Siskel Center has installed a 7.1 surround-system solely for the purpose of accommodating Godard’s ambitious 7.1 stereo soundtrack. (2018, 90 min, DCP Digital) MGS


The Last Ten Movies I Saw

1. Sherlock Jr. (Keaton)
2. Nothing Sacred (Wellman)
3. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Wiene)
4. Mikey and Nicky (May)
5. Call Northside 777 (Hathaway)
6. Rendezvous in Chicago (Smith)
7. Our Hospitality (Keaton)
8. The Image Book (Godard)
9. Cluny Brown (Lubitsch)
10. Eighth Hours Don’t Make a Day (Fassbinder)


RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO on WGN Radio’s Patti Vasquez Show

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My fearless producer Layne Marie Williams and I were on WGN Radio’s Patti Vasquez Show last night to talk all about the Chicago Premiere of RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO at the Gene Siskel Film Center! The interview segment begins at the 38:40 mark and runs all the way until the end of the program. This is a fun, freewheeling listen. Check it out here.

If you haven’t bought tickets yet, they are selling like hotcakes! The Friday and Saturday shows, in particular, should sell out in advance so please get ’em while you still can at the Siskel’s website here.


BOYCOTT ’63 and F*** YOUR HAIR at the Siskel Center

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Kartemquin Films is still going strong after half a century (see last year’s impressive one-two punch of Bing Liu’s Minding the Gap and Steve James’ America to Me) but the short-form works of Chicago’s documentary production-company powerhouse tend to receive less exposure than its features. That should change with the release of ’63 Boycott, a provocative new short directed by Kartemquin co-founder Gordon Quinn that was recently shortlisted for an Oscar (but alas failed to receive a nomination).

Quinn’s 30-minute documentary primarily details the remarkable but strangely forgotten true story of how 250,000 Chicago students boycotted the public schools in which they were enrolled to protest segregation during the height of the Civil Rights movement. The filmmakers combine archival 16mm footage, much of it previously unseen, with present-day interviews with the original boycott participants to paint a compelling portrait of one of the largest civil rights demonstrations to take place outside of the South. But ’63 Boycott is no dusty museum piece: The filmmakers also draw parallels between the segregationist policies of Mayor Daley in the 1960s and the similarly racist policies of Rahm Emmanuel’s contemporary administration—particularly in regards to the mass closure of public schools in minority communities.

’63 Boycott is well paired with the world premiere of Jason Polevoi’s F*** Your Hair—a more light-hearted though no-less polemical non-fiction short—when both films screen together at the Gene Siskel Film Center’s annual Stranger Than Fiction Series beginning this Friday. The latter movie follows the strange odyssey of Andres Araya and Mila Ramirez, Latin American immigrants who founded Chicago’s 5 Rabbit Cerveceria and unwittingly found themselves at the center of a social protest movement after being commissioned to brew the house beer for Trump Tower.

After Trump’s disturbing campaign-trail pronouncements about Mexican immigrants, the owners of 5 Rabbit Cerveceria found themselves with little recourse but to pull their beer from the tower—a blonde ale that they promptly rebranded “Chinga Tu Pelo” (or “F*** Your Hair”). The relabeled brew catapulted 5 Rabbit to new heights of popularity as local restaurants, watering holes and individual consumers began purchasing the beer in mass quantities, making an anti-Trump statement in the process. Polevoi’s witty and engaging 38-minute shaggy-dog story, which features interviews with Hopleaf owner Michael Roper andThe Matrix co-director Lily Wachowski, should hold equal appeal for political obsessives and craft-beer aficionados alike.

The Stranger Than Fiction screenings of ’63 Boycott and F*** Your Hair will take place on Friday, January 25, Saturday, January 26 and Wednesday, January 30. Filmmakers representing both films will attend all screenings. More information, including ticket info and showtimes, can be found on the  Siskel Center’s website.


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